moby-dick-(or-the-whale)-59
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HOT FUZZ

18 April 2007

Prodded for a reply of some sorts, Niels 't Hooft, whose article on the PS3 I used in the previous rant to introduce my ideas on 'next-gen' gaming, delivered a nice little piece on his blog. It is not, and was never, my intention to start a glorious war of attrition with fierce battles episodically being fought, each of us defending their vision, so I will not reply to it. All that was said was said then and there, and the debate on what next-gen really is I gladly leave to you, in case my words inspired someone.

Rather, I should speak about the truly exhausting day I had last Tuesday, when I returned to my Tiel home to clean up the mess we left and get it ready to be turned over again to the corporate landlord. I had presumed this wouldn't take more than a few hours of staunch work, but I was sorely mistaken. We slaved away all day, four sturdy men of muscle, tearing up cardboard and carpets and creating monumental heaps of trash. It reinforced the notion I developed months ago: the more you have, the more you are disproportionately burdened by it. As great as my shame was in seeing the magnificent stacks of garbage we had produced over the courses of our separate lives, it was equalled by my relief that it was finally going down the chute of a trash compactor to be irreversibly exiled. I do not intend to replenish whatever was discarded.

Two movies are in the cinema right now that you should consider seeing: Hot Fuzz and 300. But since 300 is seemingly doing quite great by itself already, I'll devote my words to Hot Fuzz. This is the spiritual successor to the fantastic British comedy Shaun of the Dead (being a romantic comedy. with zombies.) and it is everything as wonderfully quirky. Two things in particular speak heavily in its favour. The first is that it is a brilliant comedy, a bit of a parody but never outspokenly of this or that. If anything it's a parody on movies itself, and it brings huge, hilarious jokes and more stuff to make you grin than you can shake a stick at. But the second thing is equally important and often overlooked by other, lesser comedies: it's a very good movie in and of itself. Though the tapestry of jokes is weaved thickly through the film, it's remains a film, rather than an excuse to project an outburst of silliness onto the screen. Hot Fuzz' characters are sympathetic and enjoyable, they are not clich,s and you'll find yourself caring for them. The comedy (of which there is an incredible amount) only reimburses them instead of making them their slaves and tools.

With priceless performances of the Shaun of the Dead regulars, Timothy Dalton and small roles for many famous English comedians (the movie's almost a who's-who for the British comedy world), Hot Fuzz bears a well-earned seal of recommendation. Go see it.

(And while you're at it, there are three hundred testosterone-filled, angry men thumping their feet in the adjacent viewing room, so don't be a stranger and pay them a visit as well.)

Roderick.