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'THE POINT IS YOU'RE A FOOL!'

15 January 2005

I'm a little late with this, but as you've noticed nonetheless, I've updated the pages to include Janosh. He's now acknowledged as a recurring side-character, in both the menu and the mystical Questionmark-page. Something you'll also notice is that there's still room on top for one more character, but who or what that will be I'll leave in the blue for now. He (or she. or it. or... they) won't appear for the coming while.

Gosh, just when you thought it couldn't get any more gruesome. And then I allow a whole horde of mini-clowns to spawn. Where is this all going to, I ask myself...

In between the comic-making I occasionally (at least once a day lately) indulge myself in watching a few episodes of Transformers which I own on DVD. Mind you, I'm talking about the absolutely nostalgia-drenched 80s cartoon. The first one to edge towards those dreadful spin-off series or God-forbid actually named sequels, I'll smack in the face with a medium-sized manta. Beast Wars, Energon, Armada, Robots In Disguise, blah blah blah. It's all crap, see? Even if it isn't rendered in jawdroppingly horrible 3D, the atmosphere is gone and just can't be created anymore. It's, well, 80s cartoons. There's something about them, half soaked in nostalgia, but also something a bit more proud than that.

It's the crappiness of it. The truly horrible plots. The mindboggling dialogue (read: one-liners). The cheap animation. The fact that the cartoons were created solely to sell more toys. It was kapitalist marketing gone bonkers, but at the very same time so innocent and pure in its way of thinking. Nowadays we are used to far deeper material, due to the staunch uprising of Japanese anime in the last six or seven years and the development of truly top-notch American cartoons lead by groundbreaking series as the Batman Animated Series. Because of these, we expect so much more from children's cartoons now. If one would sport the sort of ridiculous qualities of a random 80s cartoon now, we'd mock it into oblivion.

But because of the pink-hazed memories we have of the cartoons we saw two decades ago when we were children, these things have become the stuff of legend. It is this predicament that will prevent any cartoon of this age to show the same low-budget, ludicrous simplicity anymore. Weep then, children, for the innocence of crappiness has gone forever from children's cartoons.

And long live DVD, for enabling us to rewatch all those old series again, in honest and loving enjoyment.

Roderick.