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STORM YOUR THEATRES

11 December 2004

THE INCREDIBLES.

It's so good to finally lounge in the prospect of there being a cinematographic masterpiece that WON'T be cast into oblivion because the public is too frightened of it. It's such a relief that no matter what I say or do; no matter how much publicity anyone generates; this movie is a hit. On its own merits. The public is seeing this one. The mainstream is devouring it alive. And everyone loves it. Whether they do so with the sheer appreciation of the artist like I do -I don't give a nilly. I just know that this is one of these rare occasions that I have no regrets of jumping into the crowd of mad fanpeople and just ride the wave of ecstacy about seeing one of the best [animated] movies ever.

This is, of course, highly subjective. You may like The Incredibles, but not regard its perusal as a momentous event. To me, however, the latest Pixar represents everything I love and hold dear in any form of entertainment. The Incredibles does a magnificent job of twisting every dial in my body, sparking every candle that could be tittilated within me. It does everything right and leaves no box unchecked. The features are all to my liking -it's as if they made the movie specifically to please me in every way. All the ingredients are there: superheroes, lush animation, witty dialogue, highly loveable characters, an original supervillain and more superb jokes and subtle parody than you can shake a stick at.

After my mild disappointment with Finding Nemo (which I thought a nice animated picture, but had my enthusiasm tempered by a few things, among them the fact that the setting and story weren't exactly my bag and the notion that everyone was so horribly delirious with it that my expectations were far too high for any children's movie to fulfill), The Incredibles managed not only to reconfirm Pixar as masters of their domain (no Seinfeld-reference intended), but to also reinvigorate every notion of what an animated movie could be. Make no mistake; this movie lauds a whole new way for the mass to finally look at animation; as something that is also apt for adults. A notion that has strangely been unimaginable for far too long.

The Incredibles also served to inspire me, and I imagine legions of other aspiring animators and artists, to come closer to the understanding of the true power of animation. In the face of how society looks at 'cartoons', even we sometimes forget what this neglected form of valid art can look like. A movie such as this makes us remember and nudges us to philosophize and recalibrate, and above all: want to make damn good animation such as this!

Artist's influence aside, the movie is also just stupendously good. More alive and realistic than any Polar Express can be; funnier and far more nuanced in its humour and parody than any Shrek, with all its blatant single-layered spoofing,
can ever hope to aspire to. And above all; showing a human tale of such delicateness and timeless quality that one can only ask oneself what all those Hollywood bums have been doing all these decades.

Pixar rules, Brad Bird rules (he already receives plentiful kudos for The Iron Giant, but this one makes their number explode through the roof), and the Supers rule. And Violet, Violet rules the most, for being the first polygon character that made me develop a crush on.

Roderick.